Tag Archives: ivory products

Hebei Hengshui Police Seize A Large Consignment Of African Ivory And Apprehend 12 Suspects

19/01/2015

Article by Cui Zhiping and Guo Jianbo

The Hebei Province Public Security Bureau has today revealed that the Public Security Bureau of the Lake City cracked a case it has been tracking for a year, which involved making illegal sales of ivory and ivory products. Up until now, 14 suspects have been arrested, as they were found to be involved in major crimes.

In the fall of 2013, the Hengshui Public Security Bureau went into deep investigation in several villages within its jurisdiction after it learnt that there were persons engaged in ivory carving and secretly selling handicrafts. Once the police had this clue, they immediately launched an investigation, and used a variety of ways to get close to these people, in order to accurately grasp the evidence. However, the vigilance of these suspects was high, and having carved crafts for many years, on weekedays, they would continue working in the jade businesses and other businesses which they operated as cover. They had created a “forum” or “circle”, making it very difficult for people outside the circle to acquire ivory.

In early 2014, after many twists and turns, a piece of ivory was finally floundered. It was identified as a raw material of African ivory. After consultation with members of the circle, the police also learned that due to the unique colour on the ivory and the veins, the real ivory had a very high costs and there were very few imitations in the black market.

The Public Security Bureau attached great importance to the case. Under the guidance of the Bureau Chief, Zhang Zeqiang, the Bureau immediately constituted a team led by the Bureau Deputy Secretary Zhang Xiangning, Captain Du Jianting of the state security, the Public Security Chief Lim Liang, who is also the Deputy head of the task force and others, they started out on months of operation, through which the police participated. They took part in the buying and reselling of the products. This way they took information of the suspects, source of the ivory, processing, sales and other aspects, and in the process investigated each of their social relationships between people, and then one by one screening of the suspicious persons.

In September of 2014, when going through the multiple related cases, they came across a great deal of evidence, which helped the ad hoc police to begin closing down on the net. In the following 3 months, the police have rushed to Beijing, Shandong, Dezhou, Zhengzhou, Henan Province, Nanyang, Nanjing and other places and in the process arrested Wang, Guo, Li and other 12 suspects and seized a large number of African elephant ivory and crafts which included both finished and unfinished products among others. They are all worth more than 100 million yuan (Ksh. 150 million)

Going into 2015, the ad hoc police continue to intensify their efforts and 2 more suspects were forced by the police to surrender. Up to now, the Public Security Bureau has arrested a total of 14 suspects, where all of the arrested suspects are main suspects.

The original version of this article can be found in the following link:  http://news.sina.com.cn/c/2015-01-19/173531417802.shtml

Translated by Chris Kiarie

 

Retail giant Wing On lauded over move to ban ivory sales (Hong Kong)

Danny Lee, South China Morning Post

27 April, 2014Danny Lee, South China Morning Post

27 April, 2014Retail giant Wing On is banning ivory sales in its stores, in a move hailed as another significant victory in the battle against elephant poaching.

The department store chain has won praise from campaigners for its decision to kick out a tenant that sells products made from elephant tusks.

“With effect from July 7, the business co-operation between Wing On Department Stores and its concession counter, which sells ivory products, will be ceased,” the company said.

Wing On has faced pressure from campaigners since pictures emerged online of a newly renovated ivory sales counter, offering carvings and ornaments, in one of its five Hong Kong stores.

“This is a most important decision. Thank you for this farsighted decision. And thank you in the name of the elephants,” campaigner Birgit Hanan wrote on Wing On’s Facebook page.

Local environmentalists welcomed the retail giant’s move, saying it bolstered efforts to counter demand for ivory, especially from the mainland, where it is a status symbol and sometimes known as “white gold”.

Wing On’s move follows the Hong Kong government’s decision in January to burn almost all of its 30-tonne ivory stock, built up through customs seizures since 1976. “[Our decision is based on] the way we work – always reviewing what we are doing and what the community wants from us,” Wing On executive director Mark Kwok Chi-yat told the Sunday Morning Post.

Campaign group Hong Kong for Elephants co-founder Alex Hofford said Wing On’s move was another victory, but that more work was still needed to stop the sale of “blood ivory”.

“Obviously we are delighted that Wing On has seen fit to turn its back on the dirty ivory trade by joining a growing list of stores in Hong Kong that take their corporate social responsibilities seriously,” Hofford said.

“Wing On definitely deserves a pat on the back,” animal-rights activist and actress Sharon Kwok Sau-wan said.

Activists are now set to turn their attention to Yue Hwa Chinese Products, the last big player in the ivory trade, with a protest scheduled for May 14 at its six-storey emporium in Jordan.

While the sale of ivory remains legal in Hong Kong, buyers are not allowed to take it out of the city. But undercover reporters caught Yue Hwa staff apparently discussing how to flout the export ban.

Kwok said a steady flow of mainland buyers were coming to Hong Kong to seek out authentic ivory products. She called for action against “small stores and ‘holes in the wall’ that are still blatantly selling ivory”.

Wildlife groups fear smugglers are using increasingly sophisticated techniques to import and export elephant ivory. Kwok says elephant products are being passed off as mammoth ivory – which is legal to trade – when obtaining customs paperwork.

“It would be great if Hong Kong could ban the ivory trade altogether. It is such a small market,” she said.

One of the last remaining traditional department store chains in Hong Kong, Wing On operates stores in Sheung Wan, Jordan, Tsim Sha Tsui, Taikoo Shing and Discovery Bay. But the retail giant’s business has in recent years been squeezed by upscale malls and luxury goods outlets.

The ivory trade has become increasingly lucrative since a worldwide ban was imposed in 1989.

Last year, the Chinese Arts and Crafts chain put a 65kg pair of tusks on sale for HK$15 million – more than 50 times the price it asked for a bigger pair of tusks in 2002. The state-owned chain has since withdrawn ivory from sale in its Hong Kong stores.

 

First time rhino, ivory products returned: Hawks (South Africa)

Catrine Malan, Jacaranda FM

27 November 2013

A consignment of ivory products and rhino horn with an estimated value of R23 million on the black market is the first such seizure returned to South Africa, the Hawks said on Wednesday.

“It’s a first for us,” Colonel Johan Jooste told reporters in Johannesburg.

“We are very proud of everybody pulling together to bring it back.”

The consignment was seized in Hong Kong in November 2011. It took South Africa more than a year to retrieve the items, he said.

The National Prosecuting Authority, the departments of environmental affairs and international relations, and the police forensic laboratory had combined to formulate an application to get the consignment back.

Thirty-three rhino horns, 758 ivory chopsticks, and 127 ivory bracelets were returned.

“We started engaging with our counterparts in Hong Kong to see if we can root out this smuggling of rhino horn into the international market,” Jooste said.

“It took us over one year to bring back the items that were seized and also obtain documentary evidence that would give us more background and assist in investigations.”

He said the Hawks looked forward to the next stage of the investigation, which would be forensic evaluation of the rhino horns.

The chopsticks and ivory bracelets seemed to have been manufactured by custom-made machines, but it was too early to make a conclusion, he said.

“We are still investigating but we believe modern technology was used to process ivory items, locally and abroad.”

Environmental affairs department deputy director general Fundisile Mketeni said the return of the seized items was a result of ongoing engagements with the Asian bloc.

“When we heard about the consignment last year we visited Hong Kong… we are doing our part as environmental affairs.”

He said South Africa had an existing memorandum of understanding with China and was now negotiating with Hong Kong.

This was because Hong Kong was the main entry point for goods leaving South African shores.

The department said the number of rhino poached in the country this year was 891 compared to 668 last year, and 448 in 2011.

Since January 2013, 548 rhino had been poached in the Kruger National Park, 89 in Limpopo, 82 in the North west, 79 in KwaZulu-Natal, and 77 in Mpumalanga.

The total number of people arrested for rhino poaching reached 310 this week, the department said.